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APHASIA IS A REALITY!!

LIFE AFTER A STROKE

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Becky Forbis
Member
Female
About Me

My stroke was Novemer 2, 2011.  I was left paralized on my right side.  With a lot of hard work and determination, I have regained the mobility and can walk without assistance.  However, the Aphasia, I suffer with everyday.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Speaking


Bill Blodgety
Member
Male
About Me
I suffer my stroke 6 years ago. I was lucky I was in the gym when I had my stroke.
If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Physical


Bill Connors
Member
Male
71 years old
About Me

I am an aphasia therapist and founder of www.aphasiatoolbox.com.  I will be presenting in Windsor to speech therapists in May and at the International Aphasia Conference in June in Montreal.  



Bob Miller
Member
Male
67 years old
About Me

Hi I had a major hemorrhagic stroke in Oct. 2006 that affected my left side. I was making great strides until I had a second stroke in March 2010. The last one is where I was affected with aphasia though I am recovering very well..

I created a stroke support site in 2008 called Strokes Suck

Our Facebook groups are our main page, Strokes Suck UK, Strokes Suck Canada, and our Caregiver page.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Physical.


Brian Garner, Music Therapist Accredited
Member
Male
67 years old
About Me

I am a self-employed, professional Music Therapist Accredited living in Guelph.

I am also an Organist/ Choirmaster at a local Church.

My music therapy practice, 2NS4U MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES, takes me from Guelph to Elmira and Stoney Creek. In these locations and others in between I am working mostly with seniors, dealing with the challenges presented by physical, mental and geriatric disabilities.   I do also work with a number of people with Developmental Disabilities or physical or mental health disabilities.

 I studied Music Therapy at the University of Windsor, interned in New York. I have worked in Southwestern Ontario and this area for a number of years. For seven years, from 1999 to 2006 I worked in Richmond, Texas where I was a Music Therapist and the Music Therapy Coordinator as well as being the Chair of the Cultural Arts Programme Series.

I held organist/ choir director positions in Churches in both New York and Richmond, Texas, twenty-five miles south west of Houston.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

speaking


Brian Mullins
Member
Male
51 years old
About Me

I am a video/photojournalist, and while I have never suffered a stroke, I have been personally affected by a few who have.  I need to know more about the recovery process and how to be a better friend to stroke survivors.



CFaith23
Member
Female

Chayphonie
Member
Female

Frank Austin
Site Owner
Male
About Me


Frank Austin/Founder
Member
Male
53 years old
About Me

If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

speak and write


John
Member
Male

KitchenerPsychologist
Member
Male

Larry Hellerman
Member
Male
64 years old
About Me

I am a 57 yr old  retired  accountant, a 7 year stroke survivor with some left side paralysis remaining, able to live a pretty full and active life, the retirement forced on me by the stroke has given me  time to travel with friends and family; cuba, nassau, the yukon, California, and hopefully more to come.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

walking, use of left hand,


Marilyn Sherman
Member
Female
66 years old
About Me

My Story

Six years ago I suffered a left-sided lacunar stroke. I was just 52. At the time I was a busy registered nurse, mother of three, wife and avidgardener, and in the blink of an eye my world changed for ever.

 

My husband had just driven me homefrom work one cold January night, and when I tried to get out of the car I found I had difficulty putting weight on my right leg. Thinking my leg was asleep from sitting too long, I shoke my leg a few times and hobbled into thehouse, unworried. A few minutes later I began to feel unwell. My speech was becoming slurred, but I still refused to believe anything was really wrong. So I waited… and waited…. and waited. It never occurred to me, nurse that I am,that I was having a stroke. Finally, after a few hours, my worried husbandsuggested that he should take me to the local emergency department where I wasimmediately diagnosed with a stroke. But I had delayed just long enough to makeit unsafe for the doctors to administer Tissue Plasminogen Activator (TPA) to breakdown the clot. A few hours later I was admitted to a ward, and sometimeduring the night my stroke extended and I became completely paralyzed on my right side. I was rushed into the intensive care unit where I stayed for a fewdays until my condition stabilized. A week more in the hospital and I wastransferred to a rehabilitation hospital where I was to stay for 3 months andhad to learn to walk, talk, eat, dress, and go to the bathroom all over again.I became depressed and in despair. I cried at the drop of a hat. I could noteven get myself out of bed and was totally dependant on others. I hated it.That was the black bottom of my life. The journey to recovery had just begun.

 

After a long very difficult recovery, I was discharged homewith a three-point cane. My right arm hung uselessly at my side. But I wasoverjoyed to be back in my own bed at last. Fortunately I live in a bungalow and so was able to shuffle from room to room with relative ease. My wonderful husband and his friend had built a ramp to the back door to make it easier for me to go in and out. We had a standing shower in the basement, and although the stairs were a challenge, I was soon able to bathe myself. My speech was still slurred but getting better. My husband soon felt confident enough with my progress to leave me home alone and return to work. Life was slowly returning to a new normal.

 

Six weeks later I was referred to community rehabilitation,and it was there that the” new me” began. My depression had lifted a little by then, but was by no means gone, and my right arm had become excruciatingly painful. I had been given the wrong type arm splint on discharge from the rehab hospital and the pain was so bad by then that I walked into the neuro rehab unit weeping and despondent. I was met at the door by a wonderful physiotherapist who recognized immediately that the splint I had been given to wear was wrong for my body type, and fitted me with an appropriate one. Presto,in a few minutes the pain was almost completely gone. I was no more that a few meters from the front door.

 

It was at this point that hope returned. Once I had pain under control, and was placed into the hands of my superlative physiotherapists,occupational therapists, speech therapists and social workers, my life took on new meaning. I could feel myself growing stronger; I had wonderful emotional care, and when I fell into despair from time to time, I was helped to see that life could be fine again.

 

After I had finished my therapy at the neuro rehab, I joinedanother fantastic program at cardiac rehab where I began a fitness program. Each program was fitted to the individual and I safely began to improve my physical fitness and started an exercise program that I continue to this day.

 

Six years later I can walk 2-3 miles on the treadmill, liftweights, have recovered function to most of my right arm, and belong to several advocacy stroke groups. And I’m gardening again almost as much as I once did.Life is good again.


Read my blog for more stroke info  thestorkethrivers@blogspot.com

 


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

physical


Martin
Member
Male
42 years old

Nadine
Member
Female

Natasha
Member
Female
45 years old

Ross Brooks
Member
Male
80 years old
About Me

Had my stroke in 2001 while having quadruple bypass surgery in London.  I have aphasia, incontinence, memory problems and cognitive problems.  I am a CA and no longer know numbers.  I used to read a lot.  I no longer can read or use the computer.  My wife is doing this for me.  I sleep a lot because of boredom.  I go to Hardy Hearts twice a week at KW hospital.  Cardiac Rehab Centre.  Physically, I am well.  I have a scrambled brain.  I was very happy to see the photo in the paper of Frank Austin and again trying to explain to the world what aphasia means.  My hearing is also affected and a hearing aid is not helping at the moment.  I am interested in talking with others with aphasia.

Thanks,



Samantha
Member
Female
About Me

I am 39 and I had my first mini stroke in May/2011. i have two small childrean and have been married for 10 years now.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Mental


Teresa
Member
Female
About Me

Hello! You are to be congratulated for seeing your way through a stroke and its affects. I have been in discussion with a stroke survivor dealing with aphasia. I have a question.

Would you consider contributing your story? I am currently writing a book about health challenges and wondered if you are willing to share. Hopefulness is my focus. Please let me know what you think. I am on the level, wish to avoid harm to you, and will answer any questions you have. I look forward to hearing from you.

Teresa


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

no stroke

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