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APHASIA IS A REALITY!!

LIFE AFTER A STROKE

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Becky Forbis
Member
Female
About Me

My stroke was Novemer 2, 2011.  I was left paralized on my right side.  With a lot of hard work and determination, I have regained the mobility and can walk without assistance.  However, the Aphasia, I suffer with everyday.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Speaking


Bill Blodgety
Member
Male
About Me
I suffer my stroke 6 years ago. I was lucky I was in the gym when I had my stroke.
If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

Physical


Bill Connors
Member
Male
70 years old
About Me

I am an aphasia therapist and founder of www.aphasiatoolbox.com.  I will be presenting in Windsor to speech therapists in May and at the International Aphasia Conference in June in Montreal.  



Chayphonie
Member
Female

John
Member
Male

KC
Member
Female

Pat
Member
Female
57 years old
About Me

I was always interested in the functioning of the brain. It is kind of ironic that a stroke should almost be my undoing. My new pet peeve is people saying how "fine" I am, how I have recovered so perfectly. What the h do they know? They don't live in my head!

I started my voyage into the world of stroke January 21 2010 and it has been a long journey so far. So many things one takes for granted untile they are gone. Standing up straight springs to mind. I still have problems getting from thought to word. If the brain were a computer I would say my fetch command is not working. I was a computer software engineer. I also worked at freelance translating. I no longer have a good enough command of my languages.

I am at the moment in the hospital following a tonic-clonic seizure. Apparently this may be due to the skull fracture I suffered a couple of days after the stroke. I refused to go to the hospital fro 3 days after my stroke.

I used to be very social and always worked in the public. At the time of my stroke, my job was with the Canadian Federal Government calling difficult clients. Now I keep to myself and my circle of friends is very small. I keep it that way on purpose. People and noise annoy me.

Since the stroke I have anger management problems. I don't deal well with surprise, change or frustration. My sleep is changed. Nothing is the same and I get angry when people say how lucky I am. In a way they are right yet, they do not know what they are talking about. I think not being able to express myself as well as before is the most frustrating.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

speaking is harder


Teresa
Member
Female
About Me

Hello! You are to be congratulated for seeing your way through a stroke and its affects. I have been in discussion with a stroke survivor dealing with aphasia. I have a question.

Would you consider contributing your story? I am currently writing a book about health challenges and wondered if you are willing to share. Hopefulness is my focus. Please let me know what you think. I am on the level, wish to avoid harm to you, and will answer any questions you have. I look forward to hearing from you.

Teresa


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

no stroke


Tom Bigda-Peyton
Member
Male
About Me

I am a friend of the stroke recovery family.  I have been working with the Ontario Stroke Network for two years as an outside consultant and expert on the use of storytelling to promote poisitive change.  I met Frank Austin through that work.



dgillies
Member
Female
46 years old

katie moese
Member
Female
About Me


krisPT1
Member
Female
About Me


Brian Garner, Music Therapist Accredited
Member
Male
66 years old
About Me

I am a self-employed, professional Music Therapist Accredited living in Guelph.

I am also an Organist/ Choirmaster at a local Church.

My music therapy practice, 2NS4U MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES, takes me from Guelph to Elmira and Stoney Creek. In these locations and others in between I am working mostly with seniors, dealing with the challenges presented by physical, mental and geriatric disabilities.   I do also work with a number of people with Developmental Disabilities or physical or mental health disabilities.

 I studied Music Therapy at the University of Windsor, interned in New York. I have worked in Southwestern Ontario and this area for a number of years. For seven years, from 1999 to 2006 I worked in Richmond, Texas where I was a Music Therapist and the Music Therapy Coordinator as well as being the Chair of the Cultural Arts Programme Series.

I held organist/ choir director positions in Churches in both New York and Richmond, Texas, twenty-five miles south west of Houston.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

speaking


Brian Mullins
Member
Male
50 years old
About Me

I am a video/photojournalist, and while I have never suffered a stroke, I have been personally affected by a few who have.  I need to know more about the recovery process and how to be a better friend to stroke survivors.



Cathy
Member
Female

Connie
Member
Female
57 years old
About Me

I am the parent of a 21 year old stroke survivor. Our daughter sufered a massive left cerebral artery stroke in June 2010. After a year of instense physical, occupational and speech therapy, her biggest obstacle is her speech. She has aphasia and apraxia. Prior to her stroke, she was very healthy, athletic and a professional snowboard instructor in B.C. Her stroke has been confirmed as the result of using of birth control pills.

Throughout the past year, her positive attitude and determination to be an Olympic snowboarder, have played an important role in her recovery. To look at her, most people would not notice she had a stroke, until she begins to talk. To a person who had a gift to talk sincerely with anyone, her lack of speech is very evident. Sometimes she can get out what she wants, but often words are missing or do not come out as she would like. Aphasia is sometimes worse than a physical disability, people do not understand and can be very impatient. Especially for a young beautiful person, they think she is on some type of drug or just giving them a hard time. The public needs to be made more aware of these horrible invisible disabilities called aphasia and apraxia.


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

speck


DGH
Member
Male
About Me




Diana Secasan
Member
Female
About Me

Teacher


If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

My dear mother died ... because of a massive stroke in 1998, she was just 60 years old with a lot of dreams and her heart was bigger than life. Since then, my world was drifted away and that question why remains continuously in my mind...why Mama


Frank Austin
Site Owner
Male
About Me


Gary Gray
Member
Male
About Me

stroke survivor since 2002

I'm NOT the fastest turtle on the beach :P

I am on Facebook: Please "Friend" me

www.facebook.com/garydotgray 

Please "Like" my Facebook pages

www.facebook.com/stroke.survivor

www.facebook.com/mylifeafterstroke

Thanks! :)



If you had a stroke, what is harder, speak or physical...

lost speak, got it back. Lost physical still working to recover

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